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Leave GMS Alone, Already!

Good afternoon! I wrote the following entry in collaboration with a good friend of mine, Kristin Miller, who also attended GMS. This entry has been adapted, with permission, for this blog. Feel free to read the original entry, as well as her other posts on Kristin’s blog. 🙂

For many years now, the fate of The Governor Morehead School for the Blind (GMS) has been unknown, due to financial concerns, a decline in the number of students, and the beauty and location of the campus. It’s prime real-estate, so people are constantly trying to find ways to shut down the school, or even to just snatch the land from those who rely on it. Not only does the GMS campus house the k-12 program, but there is also a pre-school, and a rehabilitation center. Division of Services for the Blind is also housed on the campus, making obtaining services much easier for students and those who attend the rehabilitation center. None of this seems to matter to those who wish to close the school, and it also doesn’t seem to matter that the campus is historic. Those who are involved, and are letting greed get the best of them, aught to be ashamed of themselves.

People will note that there has been a decline in the number of students at GMS, and they will note that more and more students prefer to stay in public school. However, what they’re not telling you is that students who meet the qualifications to attend GMS have been being turned away for many years. Combine this with the instability of the school, and the fact that most parents would rather have their children with them anyway, and you have a recipe for disaster. It’s about time blind students in North Carolina feel they have a reliable place to go if they aren’t receiving a decent education in public school, and for those who do attend not to have to worry whether or not their school will exist next year, after break, or even next month.

By law, schools are supposed to provide materials and resources for all students, regardless of whether or not they have a disability. Unfortunately, visually impaired students rarely receive a good education in public schools, due to lack of resources, and funding. In many cases, students are denied access to braille instruction, computer and mobility training, and access to printed materials. I have first-hand knowledge of this; I attended a public elementary school. I was lucky if I had the right books, and very few teachers seemed to care if I kept up with the class and understood the material. I wasn’t taught braille or mobility skills, but I still had to attend a school located on the other side of town to receive even minimal services. This is no way for a child to get an education.

I’m proud to say, I graduated from GMS knowing I received the education I deserved. Not only was I surrounded by students who were just like me, the teachers and other staff members were dedicated to providing the best education possible for all students. All of my teachers knew braille, which meant that I could learn and submit assignments in the way that worked for me. Every student had access to braille, large print materials, and accessible computers. Everyone was able to learn in the way that suited them. Not to mention, the school’s location allowed for valuable mobility training, which, as an independent woman, I rely on everyday.

People need to take a step back, and focus on the purpose of GMS, instead of how much value the land holds and other plans for the land. It’s already being put to a very good use, and I believe doing anything else with the land would be a disgrace. I’m thankful my parents sent me to GMS, because without the help of The staff at GMS, I wouldn’t have received the education I deserved. I wouldn’t be the independent person I am today, and life wouldn’t hold quite as much for me. I really hope the school is able to remain open, and to continue to serve the disabled students of NC. It truly would be a shame if such a good thing was shut down.